Events

  • April 2, 2020 12:30pm to 1:30pm

    Coronavirus Conversations: Information Sharing During An Epidemic

    As the world struggles to contain the economic, political, social, and health impacts of the COVID-19 virus, it is also wrestling with how both online censorship and the open internet have helped the spread of the virus. Social media and other digital platforms provide critical opportunities outside of official channels to share accurate information about emerging diseases. However, these online platforms have also facilitated the spread of misleading information about the coronavirus. While international health authorities, governments and social media companies are engaged in efforts to combat it, they are struggling to keep up. Our experts Brian Langloss, Ph.D., and Sarah Rispin Sedlack, J.D., recently co-authored a policy brief titled “Information Sharing During an Epidemic: Policies and Best Practices” making recommendations for actions to facilitate information sharing across all platforms. Join Duke Science and Society to discuss the important lessons about the negative impact of closed information regimes on efforts to contain and combat emerging pandemics, the importance of an open internet, and the dangers of mis- and disinformation. Read more about digital epidemiology in this interview with Roll Call. RSVP to receive online link More Info and Registration

  • April 2, 2020 4:30pm to 6:30pm

    Introduction to PyTorch

    PyTorch is an open source machine learning framework popular for building neural networks. In this hands-on session, we'll walk through building and training a neural network, introducing the basic mechanics of PyTorch. This will be a virtual session. Register

  • April 8, 2020 9:00am to 1:00pm

    *POSTPONED* Introduction to Single-Cell RNA-Seq Data Analysis

    Location: Perkins-Bostock 023 This 4-hour hands-on tutorial will provide you with experience working with data from a single-cell RNA-Seq experiment. We will cover quality control, filtering, normalization, clustering, differential expression and mark identification analysis.  *Pre-requisites: Must have previously taken the GCB Academy “RNA-Seq Analysis” course.  Cost: $50 for faculty, postdocs and staff; free for grad students   This event is limited to 12 participants More Info

  • April 8, 2020 4:30pm to 6:30pm

    Molecular (Omics) Data Analysis

    Omics aims to understand biological processes by leveraging high-throughput technologies and data science. Aided by subject matter expertise, this combination has resulted in accelerated discoveries in health and disease. In this session we will go through the characteristics of the molecular data generated by some of this technologies and the fundamental processing and statistical analysis tools (including machine learning methods) that can be used to generate knowledge from these complex, high-dimensional data. Use cases include analysis of gene expression, microbiome, and proteomics data. This will be a virtual session. Register

  • April 8, 2020 4:30pm to 6:30pm

    Introduction to Data Science in Health Care Session I

    The ability to make data-driven decisions is redefining the future of patient care. This two-part series provides an introduction to the emerging field of health data science using the R software language, including data analysis and visualization, with a particular focus on its utility for insight in healthcare. No prior knowledge of data science or computer programming is assumed; laptops are required. Attendees will be provided with healthcare dataset examples, and introduced to R packages and code used to examine data. Particular attention will be paid to code interpretation and data provenance methods by learning to generate reproducible data output files. Although specific datasets will be used for analysis in class, this workshop will provide broadly applicable tools to reproducibly analyze and visualize data across the healthcare continuum. Virtual session 1 of 2. Register

  • April 9, 2020 4:30pm to 6:30pm

    Introduction to Data Science in Health Care Session II

    The ability to make data-driven decisions is redefining the future of patient care. This two-part series provides an introduction to the emerging field of health data science using the R software language, including data analysis and visualization, with a particular focus on its utility for insight in healthcare. No prior knowledge of data science or computer programming is assumed; laptops are required. Attendees will be provided with healthcare dataset examples, and introduced to R packages and code used to examine data. Particular attention will be paid to code interpretation and data provenance methods by learning to generate reproducible data output files. Although specific datasets will be used for analysis in class, this workshop will provide broadly applicable tools to reproducibly analyze and visualize data across the healthcare continuum. Virtual Session 2 of 2 Register

  • April 13, 2020 12:00pm to 1:00pm

    New Changes to the NSF Biosketch

    This webinar will focus on the upcoming changes to the NSF biosketch that will be required for NSF proposals submitted on or after June 1, 2020. We will discuss the approved format, provide a detailed walkthrough of the new systems that you will need to access to develop your biosketch, and cover best practices for its content. WebEx link will be provided to registrants. Sponsored by the Office of Campus Research Development, Office of Research Support, and the Medical Center Library and Archives Register

  • April 15, 2020 9:00am to 1:00pm

    *POSTPONED* Introduction to Microbiome Study Design and Data Analysis

    Location: Soc-Psych 133 This 4-hour tutorial will first spend time discussing important considerations for the design of your study and the collection of your samples.  It will also introduce you to the data processing and analysis methods that are used in 16S microbiome analysis. We will cover topics such as data quality control, diversity indices, and calling differentially abundant microflora.  We will provide hands-on experience that will allow you to go back to your lab and work with your own data.  Cost: $50 for faculty, postdocs and staff; free for grad students This event is limited to 12 participants More Info

  • April 15, 2020 12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Effective Lab Management

    Location: Webcast This workshop is designed for faculty who lead research labs across different disciplines. Faculty will examine approaches to cultivate a rigorous, ethical, intellectually engaging, and inclusive laboratory environment. Register

  • April 16, 2020 4:30pm to 6:30pm

    Machine Learning in Neuroimaging

    Location: Virtual Classroom This training will consist of two main sections: (1) application of ML to brain images from a clinical archive to detect brain disorders and (2) extraction of brain features from a large publicly available dataset to better understand mental health. After a brief introduction to the fundamentals of brain imaging, the first part of the class will focus on using structural brain MRI to diagnose and predict autism. Next, a deep learning technique will be applied to estimate brain volume from head CT (computed tomography) images that have poor image contrast. This technique's potential for early detection and tracking Alzheimer's disease will be presented. In the second part of the class, resting-state functional MRI (rsfMRI) data will be used to identify brain markers that may help to better understand the gender disparity in mental health. The class will conclude with evidence that suggests that rsfMRI has individually unique patterns that may serve as brain markers of certain behavioral characteristics. More Info

  • May 12, 2020 8:00am to May 15, 2020 5:00pm

    *CANCELED* IRTG Retreat

    Location: Berlin

  • May 17, 2020 12:00pm

    Evolutionary Medicine Summer Institute (EMSI)

    Location: NC StateThis year's EMSI will be be held from May 17th - May 22nd The goal of EMSI is to introduce core evolutionary concepts to a wide range of topics in human health and disease, including public health, and to train physicians and medical scientists in computational methods used in evolutionary and ecological research. EMSI brings together internationally recognized experts in evolutionary biology with students and health practitioners who want to apply these perspectives to cancer, infectious disease, evolution of microbial resistance, the microbiome, and more.Applications are due March 20, 2020. Apply

  • May 18, 2020 8:30am to 3:00pm

    REACH Equity Annual Colloquium

    Location: Trent Semans Center, Great HallREACH Equity Annual Colloquium, Fostering a New Era of Health Disparities Research and Researchers

  • May 19, 2020 9:30am to 11:00am

    *POSTPONED* Refresher on Medical Genetics and Genome Medicine

    Location: 2240 CIEMAS This 90-minute course will provide attendees with an overview of general principles of genetics, genomics and molecular biology, and clinical applications and technologies currently used in clinical practice. In particular, the course will provide an overview of genomics, genome-wide association studies and other large initiatives and a range of testing technologies for diagnosis and treatment. Introduction of new technologies such as liquid biopsies will also be briefly discussed. Continuing education credits will be available. Cost: Free More Info

  • May 29, 2020 8:30am to 3:30pm

    Duke Single-Cell Science Colloquium

    Location: Trent Semans Center Great HallJoin us for a day-long colloquium to discuss biology, technology and disease in the field of single-cell science! .  Speakers and panels will discuss applications, development of technology, and data analysis in the field of single-cell science.  There will be a poster session with prizes and lunch will be provided.

  • June 4, 2020 8:00am to June 5, 2020 5:00pm

    Duke-Stanford Cardiovascular Research Symposium

    Location: Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans Center | Durham, NC 27708The Duke Cardiovascular Research Center and the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute will host the Duke-Stanford Cardiovascular Research Symposium, June 4-5, 2020.The Symposium honors Robert J. Lefkowitz, M.D., and Brian Kolbilka, M.D., who received the Nobel Prize for Chemistry 2012.This symposium is supported by the Edna and Fred L. Mandel, Jr. Foundation. The overall goal of the activities of this continuing medical education (CME) program is to enhance learners’ knowledge in the areas of basic and clinical cardiovascular disease research.Symposium OrganizersHoward A. Rockman: Professor of MedicineEdward S. Orgain:  Professor of Cardiology, in the School of Medicine, Professor in Cell Biology, Professor in Molecular Genetics and MicrobiologyJoseph Wu: Professor of Medicine, Stanford UniversitySean Wu: Associate Professor of Medicine, Stanford UniversityInvited FacultyDennis Abraham: Assistant Professor of Medicine, Duke UniversityKevin Alexander: Instructor of Medicine, Stanford UniversityNenad Bursac: Associate Professor of Medicine, Duke UniversityVinicio de Jesus Perez: Associate Professor of Medicine, Stanford UniversityBastiaan Driehuys: Professor of Radiology, Duke UniversityVictor Dzau: Professor of Medicine, Duke UniversityNeil Freedman: Professor of Medicine, Duke UniversityMarat Fudim: Cardiology Fellow, Duke University*Charlie Gersbach: Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Duke UniversityMark Herman: Associate Professor of Medicine, Duke UniversityConrad Hodgkinson: Assistant Professor of Medicine, Duke UniversityChris Holley: Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Duke UniversityAlem Kahsai: Assistant Professor of Medicine, Duke UniversityRavi Karra: Assistant Professor of Medicine, Duke UniversityChristopher Kontos: Professor of Medicine, Duke UniversityAndrew Landstrom: Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Duke UniversityNicholas Leeper: Professor of Surgery, Stanford UniversityKen Mahaffey: Professor of Medicine, Stanford University*Doug Marchuk: Professor of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke UniversityRobert McGarrah: Assistant Professor of Medicine, Duke UniversityMark Mercola: Professor of Medicine, Stanford UniversityChris Newgard: Professor of Medicine, Duke UniversityKishan Parikh: Assistant Professor of Medicine, Duke UniversityManesh Patel: Professor of Medicine, Duke UniversityKen Poss: Professor of Medicine, Duke UniversityMarlene Rabinovitch: Professor of Pediatric Cardiology, Stanford UniversitySudarshan Rajagopal: Associate Professor of Medicine, Duke UniversitySvati Shah: Professor of Medicine, Duke UniversitySudha Shenoy: Associate Professor of Medicine, Duke UniversityMichael Snyder: Professor of Genetics, Stanford UniversityDeepak Srivastava: Professor of Pediatrics, University of California, San FranciscoJeff Teuteberg: Associate Professor of Medicine, Stanford UniversityPhil Tsao: Professor (Research) of Medicine, Stanford UniversityJim Wisler: Assistant Professor of Medicine, Duke UniversityLaura Wingler: Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Medicine, Duke University*Greg Wray: Professor of Biology, Duke UniversityAndrea Yu: Assistant Professor of Medicine, Duke UniversityTarget AudienceThis program is designed to meet the continuing education (CE) needs of physicians and research scientists.Learning ObjectivesAt the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:Present new concepts regarding pulmonary hypertension as it applies to cardiovascular researchIdentify key developments in the area of regeneration, including cardiovascular embryonic development scienceHighlight cutting edge concepts in heart failure researchHighlight cutting edge concepts regarding vascular biology and human genetics in cardiovascular disease and identify new research approachesHighlight cutting edge concepts regarding gene editing, genome biology and identify new research approachesShare basic research relevant to arrhythmia, including basic, clinical, and translational screening platformsHighlight cutting edge concepts of the metabolomics and genetics of cardiovascular diseasesHighlight cutting edge concepts regarding cell signaling and G Protein Coupled ReceptorsJoint Accreditation StatementIn support of improving patient care, the Duke University Health System Department of Clinical Education and Professional Development is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), to provide continuing education for the health care team. Physicians: Duke University Health System Department of Clinical Education and Professional Development designates this live activity for a maximum of _______ AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM. Physicians should claim only credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.RegistrationThere is no fee to attend the symposium, however registration is required.Register Event Contact: Christy Darnell* Denotes GCB Membership