Wray named AAAS Fellow

Greg Wray, Ph.D.
GCB News

Wray named AAAS Fellow

Center for Genomic and Computational Biology (GCB) Director Greg Wray is one of five faculty members and one staff member from Duke to be named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

He is among six new fellows at Duke and 416 total new fellows across the nation this year who are being recognized for outstanding efforts to advance science or its applications.

Wray has been recognized by the division of biological sciences for his contributions to the evolution and mechanisms of development, using sea urchins and primates as model systems.

Karl Leif Bates, Krishnendu Chakrabarty, Micah Luftig, William Steinbach and Georgia Tomaras have also been named AAAS Fellows.

The new fellows will be presented with an official certificate and a gold-and-blue rosette pin (representing science and engineering, respectively) on Saturday, Feb. 16, during the 2019 AAAS Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.

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Six from Duke named Fellows of American Association for Advancement of Science

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