Two new NIH-funded centers to explore impacts of genomic variation in health, disease

Charlie Gersbach, Greg Crawford, Tim Reddy, Andrew Allen, David Page, and Sayan Mukherjee.
GCB News

Two new NIH-funded centers to explore impacts of genomic variation in health, disease

Duke University is the recipient of two large grants totaling nearly $12 million from the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) as part of its new Impact of Genomic Variation on Function (IGVF) Consortium. The IGVF Consortium will bring investigators together in a highly collaborative effort to examine how genomes function, how genome function shapes phenotypes, and how these processes are influenced by genomic variation. Grant recipients are distributed across five new types of centers: Functional Characterization Centers, Regulatory Network Projects, Mapping Centers, Predictive Modeling Centers and a Data and Administrative Coordinating Center. NHGRI has committed a total of $185 million to the new IGVF Consortium across 25 awards, two of which are allocated to Duke, including both a Functional Characterization Center and a Predictive Modeling Center.

Read full story at the Center for Advanced Genomic Technologies

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