Research Roundup: May 2018

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GCB News

Research Roundup: May 2018

Here are summaries of a selection of the papers published by GCB faculty in May 2018:

Childhood & Development

Terrie Moffitt, Avshalom Caspi and team used the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development study to explore whether childhood exposure to risk factors for adult disease is associated with elevated levels of a chronic inflammation marker. Read more

Diseases

Ornit Chiba-Falek, Julio Barrera and Shobana Subramanian investigated the broader effect on expression changes of genes implicated in late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) via genome wide association studies. They found peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ may act as a master regulator for transcribing several genes involved in LOAD pathogenesis. Read more

The Dave lab and team shows that the malaria-causing Plasmodium parasite tricks liver cells into pumping out a protein called aquaporin-3, and then steals the protein for itself. Using an inhibitor to disable aquaporin-3 curtails the parasite’s ability to reproduce inside the liver. Read more

Doug Marchuk and team discovered that interleukin‐4 receptor α may represent a novel target and pathway for therapeutic development in ischemic stroke. Read more

Tissue Regeneration

Charlie Gersbach and team are tackling different ways to someday provide treatments for patients with injury or degeneration of musculoskeletal tissues. Read more

Pharmacogenetics

Susanne Haga and undergrad researcher Ariel Kantor report on their analysis of the number and types of pharmacogenetic tests offered by clinical testing laboratories in the U.S. Read more

Reviews

Xiling Shen, Kai-Yuan Chen and Anna Mae Diehl review new methodology from the University of Pennsylvania that could be used to design therapeutic strategies for liver regeneration. Read more

Charlie Gersbach and Dewran Kocak review research from three groups on a new class of diagnostic tools, created by repurposing nucleic-acid sensing systems found in bacteria. Read more

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