Events

Sep 23
Jeffrey Gray
John Hopkins University, Department of Chemical and Bimolecular Engineering

CBB Seminar: Prediction of Protein-Protein Complex Structures and Protein Crystal Design

Sep 30
Rafael Irizarry
Harvard University, Dana Farber Cancer Insitute, Department of Data Sciences

CBB Seminar Series

  • September 30, 2019 12:00pm to 4:00pm

    Introduction to DNA Sequencing Technology

    Location: 2240 CIEMASRegistration Deadline: Sept. 23During the past decade, a new generation of high-throughput DNA sequencers has transformed biomedical and biotechnology research. These new technologies have fostered the development of a wide range of applications to basic and clinical research, including SNP discovery, transcriptome profiling, genome sequencing, and epigenetics. The goal of this introductory course is to teach the basic principles of next generation sequencing technology (NGS) and to present an overview of various library preparations and their applications. Advantages and limitations of various methods will be discussed and compared across technologies/platforms (Illumina, PacBio, Oxford Nanopore, Ion Torrent). This course will also provide an introduction to primary data analysis and data quality assessment steps. Attendees will become familiar with NGS technology terms and fundamentals, NGS data format and quality, and will acquire a better understanding of how to choose a suitable NGS sequencing method or instrument for their study.Cost: FreeMore Info and registration

  • October 3, 2019 12:00pm to 1:00pm

    The Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative

    Location: Duke University Hospital Lectural Hall Room 2002Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences’ 2019-2020 Grand Rounds Karen L. Wrenn Lecture.Speaker host: Moira Rynn, M.D.Please contact Moira Ryann or Lynn Labuda if you are interested in meeting with the speaker

  • October 3, 2019 12:00pm to 1:30pm

    NSF Grants for Faculty Workshop

    Location: 249 Rubenstein Library (Carpenter Conference Room)This workshop provides step-by-step guidance for faculty writing standard NSF research and education grants.Duke faculty and staff welcome. Lunch will be provided.Registration Required

  • October 3, 2019 12:00pm to 1:00pm

    BioE Seminar: Forcing Tumor Aggression and Treatment Resistance

    Location: CIEMAS Schiciano BBiography: Dr. Weaver is currently the Director of the Center for Bioengineering and Tissue Regeneration in the Department of Surgery, and is a Professor in the Departments of Surgery, Radiation Oncology and Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences at UCSF in San Francisco, CA. Her education took place in Canada, with a bachelor’s degree in Chemistry from the University of Waterloo, an Honors Bachelor’s and PhD degree in Biochemistry from the University of Ottawa with a two year postdoctoral training at the Institute for Biological Sciences, National Research Council of Canada and a 5 year postdoctoral tenure in Cancer Cell Biology at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory at UC Berkeley with Dr. Mina J Bissell. Dr. Weaver was recruited to the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia where she joined the faculty in the Department of Pathology as an Assistant Professor and was appointed a full member of the Institute for Medicine and Engineering. In mid-2006 she relocated to UCSF in San Francisco as an Associate Professor in the Department of Surgery with a joint appointment in Anatomy to take on the Directorship of the Center for Bioengineering & Tissue regeneration. She was invited to join the UCSF Cancer Center and Stem Cell Programs in 2007 and was cross appointed to the newly formed Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences in 2008 and was promoted to full Professor in 2010. Dr. Weaver has over 20 years of experience in leading interdisciplinary research in oncology, including leadership of significant program projects including the Bay Area Physical Sciences and Oncology program and the UCSF Tumor Microenvironment Brain Program that merge approaches in the physical/engineering sciences with cancer cell biology and emphasize the role of the tumor microenvironment. Dr. Weaver has been recognized for her research and leadership through receipt of several awards including the DOD BCRP Scholar award in 2005 and the DOD BCRP Scholar expansion award in 2013 for exceptional creativity in breast cancer research and the ASCB WICB Midcareer award for sustained excellence in cell biology research in 2014. Most recently she was elected as the chair of the AACR TMEN working group in 2015 and she was elected to be a fellow of the American Society for Cell Biology in 2017. Her research program focuses on the contribution of force, cell-intrinsic as well as extracellular matrix, to breast, pancreatic and glioblastoma tumor development and treatment. She also have an active research program exploring the interplay between cell and tissue level force and human embryonic stem cell differentiation..

  • October 9, 2019 8:30am

    NGS Targeted Enrichment and CRISPR Seminars and Custom Design Workshop

    Location: CIEMAS 2240Targeted Enrichment: The Path to NGS Process Efficiency8:30am-9:30amCustom Panel Design Workshop 9:30am-10am***************************10am-10:30am Break***************************Unlocking the Power of Genome Engineering with the Agilent SureGuide Portfolio10:30am-11:30am CRISPR Guide Library Design Workshop11:30pm-12pm12pm-1:30pm Custom Design Consultation as needed.AbstractsTargeted Enrichment: The Path to NGS Process EfficiencyKathleen Corcoran, Ph.D.Field Application ScientistDiagnostics and Genomics GroupAgilent Technologies, Inc. While next-generation sequencing has revolutionized the way genomes are sequenced, this technology possesses a fundamental weakness – the inability to easily target specific regions of the genome. This seminar’s focus will be how targeted enrichment/capture enables a more cost and process efficient option to obtaining valuable genomic, transcriptomic and methylomic data. Whether it be whole exome or a custom subset of genes, transcripts or methylated regions, targeted enrichment allows for the economical use of your flow cell and the opportunity to process more samples per sequencing run. Additionally, it streamlines data analysis and minimizes data to be stored, as it is focused on only your regions of interest. Join us to better understand where and how targeted enrichment can benefit your research.The Custom Panel Design Workshop will introduce the use of the SureDesign software tool to create custom targeted panels for NGS applications. If you would like to actively participate please bring your laptop.Unlocking the Power of Genome Engineering with the Agilent SureGuide PortfolioDavid J WeissGlobal Product ManagerDiagnostics and Genomics GroupAgilent Technologies, Inc.The application of next generation synthetic biology tools to functional genomics has loosened the bottleneck associated with understanding the functional impact of the data being generated by Next Generation Sequencing.  This seminar will focus on the tools used to achieve this progress.  Hear about the newest features in CRISPR applications including the use of CRISPR A/I as well as single gRNAs that have been chemically modified to increase specificity and performance.  Attend this seminar to learn more about the tools that will enable you to take your research to the next level.The CRISPR Library Design Workshop will introduce the use of the SureDesign software tool to create custom CRISPR guide libraries. If you would like to actively participate please bring your laptop.Please contact your local Agilent Genomics Account Manager with any inquiries you may have: Sara Hardy at sara.hardy@agilent.com  

  • October 11, 2019 1:00pm

    eQTL mapping using RNA-seq data, assumptions, implementations, and cautions

    Location: MSRB 3, 1125 StatGen Seminar SeriesUsing information from allele-specific gene expression (ASE) can sub-stantially improve the power for mapping gene expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). A few methods have been proposed towards this end. We compare these methods and demonstrate the limitations and ad-vantages of each method. We will also discuss our recent work on cell type-specific eQTL mapping to identify cell type-specific eQTLs using bulk tissue gene expression data and estimated cell type proportions.

  • October 14, 2019 11:30am to 12:30pm

    CBB Seminar: Machine Learning Based Therapeutic Design

    Location: 4233 FrenchThe computational biology seminar is a weekly series of seminars on topics in computational biology. This week, join us as David Gifford from MIT Department of Computer Science and Biological Engineering gives a presentation titled, "Machine Learning Based Therapeutic Design."Host: Alex Hartemink

  • October 14, 2019 11:30am to October 17, 2019 5:00pm

    Inaugural School of Medicine Research Week

    Location: Sixth Floor, Trent Semans CenterRegistration and Lunch Begin Daily at 11:30 a.m. All faculty, staff, trainees and students welcome.GCB faculty member Lawrence David will host a lecture on Monday, October 14.agenda:Monday, October 14Duke faculty Lectures12:00 - 12:30 p.m. Shelley Hwang, M.D., MPH, Mary and Deryl Hart Professor of Surgery12:30 - 1:00 p.m. Lawrence David, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Molecular Genetics and MicrobiologyDuke office of scientific integrity research town hall2:00 - 3:30 p.m. Community Empowerment: Supporting a Speak-up Culture at Duke | Great Hall, Trent Semans CenterTuesday, October 15Robert J. Lefkowitz, M.D., Distinguished Lecture12:00 - 1:00 p.m. Karl Deisseroth, M.D., Ph.D., D.H. Chen Professor, Professor of Bioengineering and Psychiatry and Behavior Sciences, Stanford UniversityWednesday, OCtober 16Duke Faculty Lectures12:00 - 12:30 p.m. Chris Woods, M.D., Professor of Medicine12:30 - 1:00 p.m. Svati Shah, M.D., MHS, Associate Dean and Director of Duke Precision Genomics CollaboratoryThursday, October 17Innovation Jam10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Presented by Duke Institute for Health Innovation. No registration required.Poster Session12:00 - 1:00 p.m. Basiv and Cliical Departments representedClinical Keynote Lecture and ReceptionRichard Lifton, M.D., Ph.D., President, The Rockefeller UniversityRegister More Info

  • October 18, 2019 11:00am to 3:00pm

    Scholars Photo Day

    Location: Broadhead Center, Second Floor, Chaplin Family Lounge (Room 247)Need a new photo for your Scholars profile? Come to our next Scholars Photo Day!Free and open to all Duke faculty, researchers, graduate/PhD students, and anyone with a Scholars profile who needs an up-to-date professional head shot.  Here’s what to expect:           1. Arrive at photo day (No RSVP needed—But please bring your Duke Card).           2. Sign in with your name, organization, and email address.           3. Smile!           4. Downloadable photos will be made available in November.Note: Based on our previous photo days, the process generally takes 5 – 15 minutes. Actual wait times will be announced on Twitter  (@ScholarsatDuke) every hour throughout the session.

  • October 21, 2019 11:30am to 12:30pm

    CBB Seminar: Deep Learning Methods for Fine Mapping and Discovery in Genomic Association Studies

    Location: 4233 FrenchThe computational biology seminar is a weekly series of seminars on topics in computational biology. This week, join us as Lorin Crawford from Brown University Department of Biostatistics gives a presentation titled, "Deep Learning Methods for Fine Mapping and Discovery in Genomic Association Studies."Host: Melyssa Minto

  • October 24, 2019 8:30am to 7:00pm

    1st Annual Symposium on Big Data and Precision Health

    Location: Great Hall, Trent Semans CenterSymposium hosted by the Woo Center for Big Data and Precision Health, directed by GCB faculty member Xiling Shen. GCB faculty members David Hsu, Neil Surana and Charlie Gersbach will be featured speakers.Join us for a full day of dynamic discussions with distinguished speakers and panelists to learn more about cutting-edge research in the multidisciplinary field of big data and precision health. This inaugural annual event will offer stimulating sessions as well as opportunities to network and discuss potential collaborations.Registered attendees receive: Admission to the conference, conference materials, boxed lunch, poster session/cocktail receptionMore infoRegisterAgenda8:30 A.M. - Registration opens9:00 A.M. - Opening remarksXiling Shen, PhD | Director, Woo Center for Big Data and Precision Health (DAP), Duke UniversityRavi Bellamkonda, PhD | Dean, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University9:20 A.M. - Keynote AddressHans Clevers, MD, PhD | University Medical Center Utrecht and Utrecht University, The Netherlands10:10 A.M. - Session 1: Precision Medicine in TranslationChair: Xiaofan Wang, PhD | Donald and Elizabeth Cooke Professor of Cancer Research, School of Medicine, Duke UniversitySteven Lipkin, MD, PhD | Vice Chair of Research, Director of Cancer Genetics Clinic, Weill Cornell Medicine20 minutes each:Ashutosh Chilkoti, PhD | Alan L. Kaganov Professor, Biomedical Engineering, Duke UniversityPurushothama Tata, PhD | Assistant Professor of Cell Biology, Duke UniversityJatin Roper, MD | Assistant Professor of Medicine, Duke UniversityNeil Surana, MD, PhD | Assistant Professor, Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke University12:05 P.M. LUNCH SESSION: CZI SINGLE CELL ATLAS (Lunch provided)Jonah Cool, PhD | Science Program Officer, Chan Zuckerberg Initiative1:05 P.M. - Plenary LectureCalvin Kuo, MD, PhD | Vice Chair of Research, Lead of Cancer Biology Program, Stanford University1:45 P.M. - Session 2: Genomic Engineering and RegenerationChair: Geoffrey Ginsberg, MD, PhD, | Director, Center for Applied Genomics & Precision Medicine, MEDx, Duke UniversityJenny Chang, MD | Director, Houston Methodist Cancer Center 20 minutes each:Ken Poss, PhD, | Director of Regeneration Next Initiative, Duke UniversityCharlie Gersbach, PhD | Director, Center for Advanced Genomic Technologies, Duke UniversityYarui Diao, PhD | Assistant Professor of Cell Biology, DukeLuis Saraiva, PhD| Director, Metabolism and Diabetes Program, Sidra Medicine3:40 P.M. COFFEE BREAK 4:00 P.M. - Session 3: AI and Health DataChair: Michael Pencina, PhD | Vice Dean for Data Science and Information Technology, School of Medicine, Duke UniversityJessie Tenenbaum, PhD |  Chief Data Officer, NC Department of Health and Human Services20 minutes each:Lawrence Carin, PhD | Vice Provost for Research, Duke UniversityJessilyn Dunn, PhD | Assistant Professor, Biomedical Engineering, Duke UniversityDAP Project Overviews (10 minutes each):AI Imaging: Kyle Lafata, PhD | Postdoctoral Fellow, Radiation Oncology, DukeOuwen Huang | Graduate Fellow, DukeHealth Data: Michael Gao | Data Scientist, Duke Institute for Health InnovationPrecision Medicine: David Hsu, MD, PhD | Assistant Professor of Medicine, DukeZhaohui Wang PhD |  Executive Director, DAP 5:45 P.M. - Closing remarksDAP Director6:00-7:00 P.M. - Poster Session & ReceptionPosters are exhibited in the Trent Semans Center, Great Hall AtriumDAP Symposium Cocktail Reception in the Trent Semans Center, Great Hall Atrium 6:00 P.M. COCKTAIL RECEPTION(Heavy hors d’oeuvres will be served)

  • October 28, 2019 11:30am to 12:30pm

    CBB Seminar Series

    Location: 4233 FrenchThe computational biology seminar is a weekly series of seminars on topics in computational biology. This week, join us as Mona Singh from Princeton Univeristy Department of Computer Science gives a presentation.Host: Alejandro Ochoa

  • November 4, 2019 11:30am to 12:30pm

    CBB Seminar: How Cell Measure Length

    Location: French 4233The computational biology seminar is a weekly series of seminars on topics in computational biology. This week, join us as Jané Kondev from Brandeis University Department of Physics gives a presentation titled, "How Cell Measure Length."Host: Danny Lew

  • November 4, 2019 8:30pm to November 5, 2019 4:30pm

    Introduction to Scientific Computing for Genomics

    Location: 127 BostockRegistration Deadline: October 28This is a 2-day course, lasting from 8:30 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. both days.Computing has become an integral and indispensable part of genomic biology. This course teaches basic skills in scientific computing, with a focus on applications for genomic science, aimed at making you more productive, your computational work more reliable, and your research easier to reproduce and extend, including by your future self. The course includes introductions to (1) using Unix shell commands to efficiently find, organize, and stage data for analysis; (2) basic data types, control flows, functions, and 3rd party packages for the Python programming language commonly encountered in scientific computing; (3) using version control to manage with confidence the numerous directions research code takes from inception to publication; and (4) effectively using a high-performance computing cluster to run computational analyses. The format of the course is inspired by the acclaimed Software Carpentry-style bootcamps. Hence, this is a fully hands-on workshop, and students are expected to bring a laptop.Cost: $200 for faculty, postdocs and staff; Free for grad studentsMore info and registration

  • November 5, 2019 5:00pm to 7:00pm

    3rd Annual Invented at Duke Celebration

    Location: Penn PavilionCo-hosted by Duke OLV & Duke I&E, Invented at Duke celebrates and promotes the diverse accomplishments of Duke innovators and entrepreneurs. The event showcases select technologies, inventions, and novel ideas–illustrating the breadth of Duke discoveries–while also highlighting Duke’s innovation and entrepreneurship resources and facilitating discussions among Duke inventors and the broader Duke community. The event aims to create an atmosphere of celebration around innovations coming out of Duke, provide education about Duke’s resources, and serve as a platform for inventors to engage with each other, the local investment community, alumni, Duke leadership, and researchers.At 5:30 p.m., we'll hear special remarks from this year's guest speaker, Matt Kane, CEO of Precision Biosciences, a recently-made-public company spun out of the School of Medicine. Precision uses a proprietary genome editing method called ARCUS to overcome cancers, cure genetic diseases, and create safer, more productive food sources.If you're an inventor, entrepreneur, researcher, licensee, investor, or someone interested in partnering with Duke, we hope you'll join us for our 3rd Annual #InventedAtDuke Celebration.GCB's Bruce Donald and his invention Gavilián Biodesign will be featured at this event.Please note: There will be shuttles running continuously from the Washington Duke/JB Duke to Penn Pavilion from 5 - 7:30 p.m.Please RSVPQuestions? Contact Celeste Ferguson or Sarah MorrisonCheck out previous years' event

  • November 8, 2019 1:00pm to 5:00pm

    Fundamentals of Mass Spectrometry for Proteomics and Metabolomics

    Location: 2240 CIEMASRegistration Deadline: Nov. 1Liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) continues to be the key technology for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of peptides, proteins and metabolites for both basic and clinical research projects. This GCB Academy session is designed as an introduction for researchers needing to expand their knowledge of the use of LC/MS/MS-based methods for proteomics and metabolomics, and thus help researchers better understand how these technologies can help inform their research goals. Background material in basic protein/metabolite chemistries will be provided, with an emphasis on how to use the physicochemical characteristics of these biomolecules for sample preparation specifically for LC/MS/MS analyses. In addition, the fundamentals of liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry will be discussed to enable students to understand the nuances of the experimental designs required to address their specific project. Real-world examples will be used to illustrate sample preparation and analysis strategies, including basic identification projects, characterization of Post-Translational Modifications and differential expression analyses (including 'omic biomarker discovery and targeted biomarker verification).Cost: FreeMore info and registration

  • November 11, 2019 9:00am to 1:00pm

    RNA-Seq Analysis

    Location: Old Chem 003Registration deadline: Nov. 4This 4-hour tutorial will provide you with a better understanding of the data processing and analysis methods that are used in RNA-seq analysis. We will cover topics such as data quality control, normalization, and calling differentially expressed genes. We will provide hands-on experience that will allow you to go back to your lab and work with your own data.Cost: $50 for faculty, postdocs and staff; free for grad studentsMore info and registration

  • November 11, 2019 11:30am to 12:30pm

    CBB Seminar: GeneFishing: a method to reconstruct context-specific portraits of biological processes and its application to cholesterol metabolism

    Location: 4233 FrenchThe computational biology seminar is a weekly series of seminars on topics in computational biology. This week, join us as Haiyan Huang from Berkley Department of Statistics gives a presentation titled, "GeneFishing: a method to reconstruct context-specific portraits of biological processes and its application to cholesterol metabolism."Host: Jichun Xie

  • November 15, 2019 1:00pm to 5:00pm

    Experimental Design: Get the Most Out of Your Proteome

    Location: 2240 CIEMASRegistration Deadline: Nov. 8This course will provide an in-depth overview of experimental design, focusing on proteomic analysis of protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) and protein expression in (but not limited to) mammalian cells, tissues and biofluids. Topics will be aimed at getting maximum biological information from your samples. We will discuss methods for enriching subproteomes and PTMs; best practices for insuring sample integrity and avoiding common contaminants that will be carried downstream; and how to be aware of additional factors that might influence reproducibility across biological replicates. In addition, we will discuss where discovery-based or targeted proteomic analyses may be most appropriate. Feel free to bring specific questions about your favorite proteins, model systems, or biological matrices. Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Mass Spectrometry for Proteomic and Metabolomic Analyses, encouraged, but not required.Cost: freeMore info and registration

  • November 18, 2019 9:00am to 1:00pm

    Single-Cell RNA-Seq

    Location: 133 Soc-PsychRegistration Deadline: Nov. 11This 4-hour hands-on tutorial will provide you with experience working with data from a single-cell RNA-Seq experiment. We will cover quality control, filtering, normalization, clustering, differential expression and mark identification analysis.Cost: $50 for faculty, postdocs and staff; free for grad studentsMore info and registration

  • November 18, 2019 11:30am to 12:30pm

    CBB Seminar Series

    Location: 4233 FrenchThe computational biology seminar is a weekly series of seminars on topics in computational biology. This week, join us as Tony Capra from Vanderbilt University Department of Biological Sciences gives a presentation.Host: Greg Wray

  • November 22, 2019 1:00pm to 5:00pm

    Proteomic Data Analysis: Strategies and Software Solutions

    Location: 2240 CIEMASRegistration Deadline: Nov. 15Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC/MS) is a versatile tool for the qualitative and quantitative characterization of peptides, proteins and metabolites for both basic and clinical research projects. One of the most important considerations in being able to translate LC-MS datasets into meaningful biological observations is to effectively use open source software packages and/or online resources geared toward LC-MS based datasets.  This GCB Academy session is designed as a complement to GCB Academy course “Fundamentals of Mass Spectrometry for Proteomic and Metabolomic Analyses” (Nov. 7) and GCB Academy course “Experimental Design: Get the most your of your proteome” (Nov. 8) and is intended for users of the Proteomics and Metabolomics Shared Resource who have or plan on generating LC/MS based Proteomic Datasets with the Shared Resource. This first portion of the course will focus on the effective use of Scaffold to characterize qualitative proteomic datasets. This will include an overview of Scaffold and features such as interpretation of spectral matches at a protein or peptide level, gene ontology classification, homology matching, spectral count data, and data export. The second portion of the course will cover common proteomic data analysis strategies from supplemental data (typically .xlsx file formats from Rosetta Elucidator) provided as part of the Shared Resource’s quantitative proteomic workflows. This will include an overview of the typical features of a quantitative data return document, various data summarization levels, calculating peptide/protein relative fold-changes and p-values, exporting data for motif analysis (PTM specific datasets), and performing Principle Component Analysis (PCA) and 2D Clustering within JMP Pro.Cost: FreeMore info and registration

  • November 25, 2019 11:30am to 12:30pm

    CBB Seminar Series

    Location: 4233 FrenchThe computational biology seminar is a weekly series of seminars on topics in computational biology. This week, join us as Christina Williams from the VA Cooperative Studies Program Epidemiology Center gives a presentation.Host: Beth Hauser

  • November 25, 2019 1:00pm to 5:00pm

    Metabolomics for Clinical and Basic Research

    Location: 2240 CIEMASRegistration Deadline: Nov. 18Metabolomics has emerged as a powerful approach for characterization of molecular systems and also development of biomarkers for disease progression or diagnosis. Broadly, metabolomics is the characterization of small molecules by mass spectrometry and can include both "unbiased" or non-targeted techniques, as well as "targeted" methods.   The measurement of metabolites by mass spectrometry is also directly translatable to the clinic; many common assays such as amino acids, acylcarnitines, vitamin D epimers, steroid hormones, and drugs of abuse are all clinical mass spec assays.  Whether developing a novel assay or using a validated metabolite assay, the most important aspect for a successful metabolomics study is deciding which technique to use and understanding the data each approach will likely be able to provide. In this course, we will discuss sample types which are amenable to metabolomics, and utilize case studies to discuss the critical differences in targeted and non-targeted metabolomics and an investigator might choose one over another.  We will use example datasets to demonstrate techniques for analysis of high dimensional metabolomic data.  We will also cover the methods needed for accurate quantification, how to enable longitudinal translation of metabolomics assays, and how a targeted mass spec assay may differ in utilization from a clinical ELISA.Cost: FreeMore info and registration

  • December 6, 2019 9:00am to 10:30am

    Introduction to Biobanking

    Location: 2240 CIEMASRegistration Deadline: Dec. 2This seminar will offer an introductory overview of key considerations and best practices in establishing and maintaining clinical biospecimen collections for genomic and precision medicine research. Topics covered will include:  basic concepts in biobank and cohort research; role of standardization, harmonization, and quality control; maintaining unique sample identification and robust chain-of-custody tracking; need for secure information and inventory management systems for samples and data; important considerations in repository design; and an overview of biobanking resources at Duke and beyond.Cost: FreeMore info and registration

  • December 9, 2019 11:30am to 12:30pm

    CBB Seminar: Design principles of cellular differentiation control: lessons from Bacillus subtilis

    Location: 4233 FrenchThe computational biology seminar is a weekly series of seminars on topics in computational biology. This week, join us as Oleg Igoshin from Rice University Department of Bioengineering gives a presentation entitled, "Design principles of cellular differentiation control: lessons from Bacillus subtilis."Host: Lingchong You

  • January 16, 2020 12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Resilience in Aging

    Location: Duke University Hospital Lectural Hall room 2002Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences’ 2019-2020 Grand Rounds Ewald Busse Memorial Lecture.Speaker Host: John Beyer, M.D.Please contact John Beyer or Lynn Labuda if you are interested in meeting with the speaker.

  • February 27, 2020 12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Early Emergence of Depression: Understanding Risk Factors and Treatment

    Location: Duke University Hospital Lectural Hall Room 2002Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences’ 2019-2020 Grand Rounds Lecture.Speaker host: Alison Adcock, M.D., Ph.D.Please contact Alison Adcock or Lynn Labuda if you are interested in meeting with the speaker

  • March 26, 2020 12:00pm to 1:00pm

    The Reciprocal Relationship of Neurocognitive and Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Late Life Mental Health Disorders

    Location: Duke University Hospital Lectural Hall Room 2002Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences’ 2019-2020 Grand Rounds Lecture.Speaker Host: Chris Marx, M.D.Please contact Chris Marx or Lynn Labuda if you are interested in meeting with the speaker.

  • April 2, 2020 12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Mechanisms of Gene X Environment Interactions in Psychiatry - From Molecules to Behavior

    Location: Duke University Hospital Lectural Hall Room 2002Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences’ 2019-2020 Grand Rounds Lecture.Speaker Host: Doug Williamson, Ph.D.Please contact Doug Williamson or Lynn Labuda if you are interested in meeting with the speaker.

  • May 12, 2020 8:00am to May 15, 2020 5:00pm

    IRTG Retreat

    Location: Berlin