Events

Oct 21
Oct 25
Kai Wang, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Novel bioinformatics methods to study structural variants by long-read sequencing

  • October 28, 2019 11:30am to 12:30pm

    CBB Seminar: Integrative Methods for deciphering disease networks

    Location: 4233 FrenchThe computational biology seminar is a weekly series of seminars on topics in computational biology. This week, join us as Mona Singh from Princeton Univeristy Department of Computer Science gives a presentation entitled, "Integrative Methods for Deciphering Disease Networks."Host: Alejandro Ochoa

  • November 4, 2019 11:30am to 12:30pm

    CBB Seminar: How Cell Measure Length

    Location: French 4233The computational biology seminar is a weekly series of seminars on topics in computational biology. This week, join us as Jané Kondev from Brandeis University Department of Physics gives a presentation titled, "How Cell Measure Length."Host: Danny Lew

  • November 4, 2019 8:30pm to November 5, 2019 4:30pm

    Introduction to Scientific Computing for Genomics

    Location: 127 BostockRegistration Deadline: October 28This is a 2-day course, lasting from 8:30 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. both days.Computing has become an integral and indispensable part of genomic biology. This course teaches basic skills in scientific computing, with a focus on applications for genomic science, aimed at making you more productive, your computational work more reliable, and your research easier to reproduce and extend, including by your future self. The course includes introductions to (1) using Unix shell commands to efficiently find, organize, and stage data for analysis; (2) basic data types, control flows, functions, and 3rd party packages for the Python programming language commonly encountered in scientific computing; (3) using version control to manage with confidence the numerous directions research code takes from inception to publication; and (4) effectively using a high-performance computing cluster to run computational analyses. The format of the course is inspired by the acclaimed Software Carpentry-style bootcamps. Hence, this is a fully hands-on workshop, and students are expected to bring a laptop.Cost: $200 for faculty, postdocs and staff; Free for grad studentsMore info and registration

  • November 5, 2019 5:00pm to 7:00pm

    3rd Annual Invented at Duke Celebration

    Location: Penn PavilionCo-hosted by Duke OLV & Duke I&E, Invented at Duke celebrates and promotes the diverse accomplishments of Duke innovators and entrepreneurs. The event showcases select technologies, inventions, and novel ideas–illustrating the breadth of Duke discoveries–while also highlighting Duke’s innovation and entrepreneurship resources and facilitating discussions among Duke inventors and the broader Duke community. The event aims to create an atmosphere of celebration around innovations coming out of Duke, provide education about Duke’s resources, and serve as a platform for inventors to engage with each other, the local investment community, alumni, Duke leadership, and researchers.At 5:30 p.m., we'll hear special remarks from this year's guest speaker, Matt Kane, CEO of Precision Biosciences, a recently-made-public company spun out of the School of Medicine. Precision uses a proprietary genome editing method called ARCUS to overcome cancers, cure genetic diseases, and create safer, more productive food sources.If you're an inventor, entrepreneur, researcher, licensee, investor, or someone interested in partnering with Duke, we hope you'll join us for our 3rd Annual #InventedAtDuke Celebration.GCB's Bruce Donald and his invention Gavilián Biodesign will be featured at this event.Please note: There will be shuttles running continuously from the Washington Duke/JB Duke to Penn Pavilion from 5 - 7:30 p.m.Please RSVPQuestions? Contact Celeste Ferguson or Sarah MorrisonCheck out previous years' event

  • November 8, 2019 1:00pm to 5:00pm

    Fundamentals of Mass Spectrometry for Proteomics and Metabolomics

    Location: 2240 CIEMASRegistration Deadline: Nov. 1Liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) continues to be the key technology for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of peptides, proteins and metabolites for both basic and clinical research projects. This GCB Academy session is designed as an introduction for researchers needing to expand their knowledge of the use of LC/MS/MS-based methods for proteomics and metabolomics, and thus help researchers better understand how these technologies can help inform their research goals. Background material in basic protein/metabolite chemistries will be provided, with an emphasis on how to use the physicochemical characteristics of these biomolecules for sample preparation specifically for LC/MS/MS analyses. In addition, the fundamentals of liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry will be discussed to enable students to understand the nuances of the experimental designs required to address their specific project. Real-world examples will be used to illustrate sample preparation and analysis strategies, including basic identification projects, characterization of Post-Translational Modifications and differential expression analyses (including 'omic biomarker discovery and targeted biomarker verification).Cost: FreeMore info and registration

  • November 11, 2019 9:00am to 1:00pm

    RNA-Seq Analysis

    Location: Old Chem 003Registration deadline: Nov. 4This 4-hour tutorial will provide you with a better understanding of the data processing and analysis methods that are used in RNA-seq analysis. We will cover topics such as data quality control, normalization, and calling differentially expressed genes. We will provide hands-on experience that will allow you to go back to your lab and work with your own data.Cost: $50 for faculty, postdocs and staff; free for grad studentsMore info and registration

  • November 11, 2019 11:30am to 12:30pm

    CBB Seminar: GeneFishing: a method to reconstruct context-specific portraits of biological processes and its application to cholesterol metabolism

    Location: 4233 FrenchThe computational biology seminar is a weekly series of seminars on topics in computational biology. This week, join us as Haiyan Huang from Berkley Department of Statistics gives a presentation titled, "GeneFishing: a method to reconstruct context-specific portraits of biological processes and its application to cholesterol metabolism."Host: Jichun Xie

  • November 15, 2019 1:00pm to 5:00pm

    Experimental Design: Get the Most Out of Your Proteome

    Location: 2240 CIEMASRegistration Deadline: Nov. 8This course will provide an in-depth overview of experimental design, focusing on proteomic analysis of protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) and protein expression in (but not limited to) mammalian cells, tissues and biofluids. Topics will be aimed at getting maximum biological information from your samples. We will discuss methods for enriching subproteomes and PTMs; best practices for insuring sample integrity and avoiding common contaminants that will be carried downstream; and how to be aware of additional factors that might influence reproducibility across biological replicates. In addition, we will discuss where discovery-based or targeted proteomic analyses may be most appropriate. Feel free to bring specific questions about your favorite proteins, model systems, or biological matrices. Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Mass Spectrometry for Proteomic and Metabolomic Analyses, encouraged, but not required.Cost: freeMore info and registration

  • November 18, 2019 9:00am to 1:00pm

    Single-Cell RNA-Seq

    Location: 133 Soc-PsychRegistration Deadline: Nov. 11This 4-hour hands-on tutorial will provide you with experience working with data from a single-cell RNA-Seq experiment. We will cover quality control, filtering, normalization, clustering, differential expression and mark identification analysis.Cost: $50 for faculty, postdocs and staff; free for grad studentsMore info and registration

  • November 18, 2019 11:30am to 12:30pm

    CBB Seminar: Diagnosing the Legacy of Neanderthal Interbreeding on Modern Humans

    Location: 4233 FrenchThe computational biology seminar is a weekly series of seminars on topics in computational biology. This week, join us as Tony Capra from Vanderbilt University Department of Biological Sciences gives a presentation entitled, "Diagnosing the Legacy of Neanderthal Interbreeding on Modern Humans."Host: Greg Wray

  • November 22, 2019 8:00am to 3:30pm

    2019 Protein Biomarkers in Precision Medicine Colloquium

    Location: Trent Semans Center, Great Hall 8GCB staff member and director of the Proteomics and Metabolomics core facility will be a presenter at this eventJoin fellow Duke researchers on Friday, November 22 for a day-long event of speakers, panels, and posters covering protein biomarkers in precision medicine!The use of protein biomarkers in precision medicine is entering an exciting new phase with the alignment of efforts to pair clinical cohorts with detailed phenotypic information, significant improvements in sensitivity of protein assays, and the development of new approaches towards multi-dimensional data analysis. This sea-change means that we may be able to map disease development and assess protein biomarkers in larger scale epidemiologic samples to provide clues to underlying mechanisms of processes such as aging, resilience, and age-related diseases.At Duke, there are a number of laboratories and core resources involved in various aspects of biomarker development and use. However, the advent of new technologies and their broader application demands a more coordinated approach in order to ensure the efficient and cost-effective use of patient and core resources. Towards this end, we are hosting a day-long colloquia that will be broadly accessible to Duke basic and clinical investigators to discuss study design, platforms, and applications in the field of protein biomarkers for precision medicine.When registering, please indicate whether or not you would like to participate in the poster session with the opportunity to win prizes! Lunch will be provided.More info and speakersRegistration

  • November 22, 2019 1:00pm to 5:00pm

    Proteomic Data Analysis: Strategies and Software Solutions

    Location: 2240 CIEMASRegistration Deadline: Nov. 15Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC/MS) is a versatile tool for the qualitative and quantitative characterization of peptides, proteins and metabolites for both basic and clinical research projects. One of the most important considerations in being able to translate LC-MS datasets into meaningful biological observations is to effectively use open source software packages and/or online resources geared toward LC-MS based datasets.  This GCB Academy session is designed as a complement to GCB Academy course “Fundamentals of Mass Spectrometry for Proteomic and Metabolomic Analyses” (Nov. 7) and GCB Academy course “Experimental Design: Get the most your of your proteome” (Nov. 8) and is intended for users of the Proteomics and Metabolomics Shared Resource who have or plan on generating LC/MS based Proteomic Datasets with the Shared Resource. This first portion of the course will focus on the effective use of Scaffold to characterize qualitative proteomic datasets. This will include an overview of Scaffold and features such as interpretation of spectral matches at a protein or peptide level, gene ontology classification, homology matching, spectral count data, and data export. The second portion of the course will cover common proteomic data analysis strategies from supplemental data (typically .xlsx file formats from Rosetta Elucidator) provided as part of the Shared Resource’s quantitative proteomic workflows. This will include an overview of the typical features of a quantitative data return document, various data summarization levels, calculating peptide/protein relative fold-changes and p-values, exporting data for motif analysis (PTM specific datasets), and performing Principle Component Analysis (PCA) and 2D Clustering within JMP Pro.Cost: FreeMore info and registration

  • November 25, 2019 11:30am to 12:30pm

    CBB Seminar Series

    Location: 4233 FrenchThe computational biology seminar is a weekly series of seminars on topics in computational biology. This week, join us as Christina Williams from the VA Cooperative Studies Program Epidemiology Center gives a presentation.Host: Beth Hauser

  • November 25, 2019 1:00pm to 5:00pm

    Metabolomics for Clinical and Basic Research

    Location: 2240 CIEMASRegistration Deadline: Nov. 18Metabolomics has emerged as a powerful approach for characterization of molecular systems and also development of biomarkers for disease progression or diagnosis. Broadly, metabolomics is the characterization of small molecules by mass spectrometry and can include both "unbiased" or non-targeted techniques, as well as "targeted" methods.   The measurement of metabolites by mass spectrometry is also directly translatable to the clinic; many common assays such as amino acids, acylcarnitines, vitamin D epimers, steroid hormones, and drugs of abuse are all clinical mass spec assays.  Whether developing a novel assay or using a validated metabolite assay, the most important aspect for a successful metabolomics study is deciding which technique to use and understanding the data each approach will likely be able to provide. In this course, we will discuss sample types which are amenable to metabolomics, and utilize case studies to discuss the critical differences in targeted and non-targeted metabolomics and an investigator might choose one over another.  We will use example datasets to demonstrate techniques for analysis of high dimensional metabolomic data.  We will also cover the methods needed for accurate quantification, how to enable longitudinal translation of metabolomics assays, and how a targeted mass spec assay may differ in utilization from a clinical ELISA.Cost: FreeMore info and registration

  • December 6, 2019 9:00am to 10:30am

    Introduction to Biobanking

    Location: 2240 CIEMASRegistration Deadline: Dec. 2This seminar will offer an introductory overview of key considerations and best practices in establishing and maintaining clinical biospecimen collections for genomic and precision medicine research. Topics covered will include:  basic concepts in biobank and cohort research; role of standardization, harmonization, and quality control; maintaining unique sample identification and robust chain-of-custody tracking; need for secure information and inventory management systems for samples and data; important considerations in repository design; and an overview of biobanking resources at Duke and beyond.Cost: FreeMore info and registration

  • December 9, 2019 11:30am to 12:30pm

    CBB Seminar: Design principles of cellular differentiation control: lessons from Bacillus subtilis

    Location: 4233 FrenchThe computational biology seminar is a weekly series of seminars on topics in computational biology. This week, join us as Oleg Igoshin from Rice University Department of Bioengineering gives a presentation entitled, "Design principles of cellular differentiation control: lessons from Bacillus subtilis."Host: Lingchong You

  • January 16, 2020 12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Resilience in Aging

    Location: Duke University Hospital Lectural Hall room 2002Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences’ 2019-2020 Grand Rounds Ewald Busse Memorial Lecture.Speaker Host: John Beyer, M.D.Please contact John Beyer or Lynn Labuda if you are interested in meeting with the speaker.

  • January 21, 2020 4:00pm to January 25, 2020 11:00pm

    Beyond a Million Genomes: From Discovery to Precision Health

    Location: Beaver Run Resort, Breckenridge, Colorado, USAHigh-throughput genotyping and DNA sequencing technologies have enabled a deeper understanding of the genetic basis of human health and disease. These genomic insights offer huge opportunities for the development and implementation of more targeted therapies and preventive strategies, known as precision health. This meeting will focus on rapidly advancing and emerging areas of precision health, emphasizing the path from discovery to clinical implementation. The Symposium will begin with the state of our current knowledge of the allelic architecture of human disease and how this knowledge is being translated into clinical practice. Sessions will cover discovery and translational advances in Mendelian diseases, rare human gene knock-outs and common multifactorial diseases. The challenges and opportunities of big data analysis and integration, such as examining large genomic databases linked to electronic health record data, will be addressed. Other topics will include translating cancer genomics to clinical advances, workshops on clinical interpretation of germline and somatic mutations, pharmacogenomics, and the role of human genomics for novel therapeutic development. Finally, we will look beyond human sequence variation to consider the role of epigenomics, the microbiome, and environment and lifestyle in precision health. The unifying theme of this Symposium is to bridge basic human genomic discovery to clinical implementation, with the goal of attracting and engaging a broad multidisciplinary audience.More infoRegister

  • February 27, 2020 12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Early Emergence of Depression: Understanding Risk Factors and Treatment

    Location: Duke University Hospital Lectural Hall Room 2002Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences’ 2019-2020 Grand Rounds Lecture.Speaker host: Alison Adcock, M.D., Ph.D.Please contact Alison Adcock or Lynn Labuda if you are interested in meeting with the speaker

  • March 26, 2020 12:00pm to 1:00pm

    The Reciprocal Relationship of Neurocognitive and Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Late Life Mental Health Disorders

    Location: Duke University Hospital Lectural Hall Room 2002Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences’ 2019-2020 Grand Rounds Lecture.Speaker Host: Chris Marx, M.D.Please contact Chris Marx or Lynn Labuda if you are interested in meeting with the speaker.

  • April 2, 2020 12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Mechanisms of Gene X Environment Interactions in Psychiatry - From Molecules to Behavior

    Location: Duke University Hospital Lectural Hall Room 2002Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences’ 2019-2020 Grand Rounds Lecture.Speaker Host: Doug Williamson, Ph.D.Please contact Doug Williamson or Lynn Labuda if you are interested in meeting with the speaker.

  • May 12, 2020 8:00am to May 15, 2020 5:00pm

    IRTG Retreat

    Location: Berlin