Computational Biology & Bioinformatics

PHD in Computational Biology & Bioinformatics

Program Principles & Goals

CBB students and faculty at the annual retreat

Computational Biology and Bioinformatics (CBB) at Duke University is an integrative, multi-disciplinary Ph.D. program that trains future leaders at the interdisciplinary intersection of quantitative and biomedical sciences.

CBB brings together 55 faculty from 18 departments—including computer science, statistics, mathematics, physics, engineering, biology, chemistry, and medical departments—to conduct cutting-edge research across a wide range of topics in computational biology and to prepare students to engage in innovative solutions to modern problems in the biomedical sciences.

CBB provides high-quality training in both quantitative and biomedical sciences through coursework; research rotations; journal clubs; weekly seminars; and hands-on mentoring from advisors, co-advisors, and dissertation committees. Students are trained to work independently and as part of collaborative teams. They learn to conduct research responsibly, with a commitment to data sharing and reproducible analysis, and they have professional development and teaching opportunities as part of their individual development plans.

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Meet A Faculty Member

  • Jack Keene
    James B. Duke Professor of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology
    The Keene Laboratory has a long-term interest in the structure and function of viral and mammalian genomes. Having determined the first genomic sequences for rabies, Ebola, Marburg and vesicular stomatitis virus, and discerned the origins of defective interfering viruses, interests shifted to the cloning of six human genes involved in autoimmune reactivity. This resulted in the identification of numerous autoimmune RRM-type RNA-binding proteins the discovery of the RRM, and the RNA targets to which they bind. The current interests of the lab surround the functions of the human RRM-ELAV/Hu proteins that are bound to a subset of cellular mRNAs involved in growth regulation neuronal plasticiyt and cancer. The laboratory demonstrated that ELAV/Hu proteins bind and regulate the expression of early response gene transcripts such as those encoding the protooncogene and cytokine proteins.

    In addition, it was shown that while stabilizing these mRNAs and/or activating their translation, the ELAV/Hu proteins participate in cellular , differentiation and carcinogenesis. More recently, the laboratory has examined dozens of RNA-binding proteins in order to identify large numbers of structurally
    and/or functionally related mRNAs that cluster in vivo based upon their binding to these proteins. This has been termed ribonomics because it involves parallel analysis of mRNA subsets en masse based upon their presence in messenger ribonucleoprotein complexes. This new approach to functional genomics is being applied to virus-infected cells, tumors and cells treated with various agents. Ribonomics has led to the identification of mRNA clusters that are posttranscriptionally regulated, and represent the organizational state of genetic information between the genome and the proteome. Dr. Keen has propsed the existence of post-transcriptional operons based upon the association of structurally and functionally-linked mRNAs in vivo.
Anna Lowegard

Anna Lowegard

6th year CBB Student; Bruce Donald Lab
Nov 19
Alberto Bartesaghi
Duke University, Depts of Computer Science & Biochemistry

CBB Seminar: Expanding the structural biology toolbox with high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy.

Nov 20
Craig Lowe
Duke University, Dept of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology

Copy number variation in vertebrate evolution and human disease

Nov 26
Madan Babu Mohan, Ph.D.
MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, UK

BME Seminar: Data Science Approaches to Biological Systems