Gregory A. Wray, PhD

Greg Wray
(919) 684-6696
French, Room 4104 124 Science Drive, Box 90325 Durham, NC 27708

Gregory A. Wray, PhD

Professor of Biology

I am an evolutionary biologist with a background in molecular and developmental biology. I'm broadly interested in the evolution of gene regulation, at the scales of single genes, networks, and genomes.

A long-term project in the Wray Lab is aimed at identifying regulatory changes that contributed to the evolution of uniquely human traits, particularly with regard to diet and physiology as well as cognition and brain anatomy. Another major project is investigating the population genetics of a developmental gene regulatory network in sea urchins.

Dr. Wray studies the evolution of genes and genomes with the broad aim of understanding the origins of biological diversity. His approach focuses on changes in the expression of genes using both empirical and computational approaches and spans scales of biological organization from single nucleotides through gene networks to entire genomes. At the finer end of this spectrum of scale, Dr. Wray's lab is focusing on understanding the functional consequences and fitness components of specific genetic variants within regulatory sequences of several genes associated with ecologically relevant traits. At the other end of the scale, researchers are developing molecular and analytical methods to detect changes in gene function throughout entire genomes, including statistical frameworks for detecting natural selection on regulatory elements and empirical approaches to identify functional variation in transcriptional regulation. At intermediate scales, Professor Bray is investigating functional variation within a dense gene network in the context of wild populations and natural perturbations. His research leverages the advantages of several different model systems, but primarily focuses on sea urchins and primates (including humans).

Gregory Wray is a Professor of Biology in Trinity College. He received his B.S. from the College of William and Mary in 1981 and his Ph.D. from Duke University in 1987. 

Research Interests

Human origins
Evolutionary genomics
Evolution of gene regulation
Gene network evolution

Recent Publications

Linchangco, GV; Foltz, DW; Reid, R; Williams, J; Nodzak, C; Kerr, AM; Miller, AK; Hunter, R; Wilson, NG; Nielsen, WJ; Mah, CL; Rouse, GW; Wray, GA; Janies, DA
October 1, 2017
Babbitt, CC; Haygood, R; Nielsen, WJ; Wray, GA
June 5, 2017